iliien:

Ok, Outlander is a good show.
But dude, the freaking opening titles. WTF THAT’S AMAZING

yep

iliien:

Ok, Outlander is a good show.

But dude, the freaking opening titles. WTF THAT’S AMAZING

yep

joannalannister:

I finished my second reading of AGOT the other day

(I read it very s l o w l y)

and I was struck by the 4 different conclusions, primarily Catelyn Stark. 

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"The future of print remains what? Try to imagine a world where the future of print is unclear: Maybe 25 year olds will start demanding news from yesterday, delivered in an unshareable format once a day. Perhaps advertisers will decide “Click to buy” is for wimps. Mobile phones: could be a fad. After all, anything could happen with print. Hard to tell, really."
- Last Call — Medium
"You see, I’m not so sure that Huxley would have hated Snapchat, because it is, essentially, the social media of lightness. It represents an escape from those heavy, sticky, eerily polished broadcasting platforms such as Facebook, LinkedIn and Pinterest – social interaction as CV – and refocuses users’ attention on their relationships."
-

The Unbearable Lightness Of Snapchat - Tech City News | Tech City News

Oh beautifully put.

snapchat

"Lal argues that this sexualized image of Mughal women’s lives is unhistorical and misleading. Far from being merely ornamental objects of desire, the women of the Mughal harem actually had a central part in the court and diplomatic life of the day. When the Emperor Akbar left Agra to pursue a rebel, for example, he left his formidable mother, Hamideh Banu, in charge of the capital and the empire—the same woman who many years earlier had, as a fourteen-year-old, initially refused the hand of the Emperor Humayun, declaring, “Oh, yes I shall marry someone; but he shall be a man whose collar my hand can touch, and not one to whose skirt it does not reach.” Throughout the chronicles of Akbar’s reign, the comings and goings of Hamideh Banu Begum to her son’s camps and campaigns are minutely chronicled and she was clearly an assertive and influential figure."
- The Most Magnificent Muslims by William Dalrymple | The New York Review of Books